Conditions

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Auto -Immune Disorders

Immune system disorders cause abnormally low activity or over activity of the immune system. In cases of immune system over activity, the body attacks and damages its own tissues (autoimmune diseases). Immune deficiency diseases decrease the body's ability to fight invaders, causing vulnerability to infections.

In response to an unknown trigger, the immune system may begin producing antibodies that instead of fighting infections, attack the body's own tissues. Treatment for autoimmune diseases generally focuses on reducing immune system activity. Examples of autoimmune diseases include:

  • Rheumatoid arthritis. The immune system produces antibodies that attach to the linings of joints. Immune system cells then attack the joints, causing inflammation, swelling, and pain. If untreated, rheumatoid arthritis causes gradually causes permanent joint damage. Treatments for rheumatoid arthritis can include various oral or injectable medications that reduce immune system over activity.

  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus). People with lupus develop autoimmune antibodies that can attach to tissues throughout the body. The joints, lungs, blood cells, nerves, and kidneys are commonly affected in lupus. Treatment often requires daily oral prednisone, a steroid that reduces immune system function.

  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The immune system attacks the lining of the intestines, causing episodes of diarrhea, rectal bleeding, urgent bowel movements, abdominal pain, fever, and weight loss. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two major forms of IBD. Oral and injected immune-suppressing medicines can treat IBD.

  • Multiple sclerosis (MS). The immune system attacks nerve cells, causing symptoms that can include pain, blindness, weakness, poor coordination, and muscle spasms. Various medicines that suppress the immune system can be used to treat multiple sclerosis.

  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Immune system antibodies attack and destroy insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. By young adulthood, people with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections to survive.

  • Guillain-Barre syndrome. The immune system attacks the nerves controlling muscles in the legs and sometimes the arms and upper body. Weakness results, which can sometimes be severe. Filtering the blood with a procedure called plasmapheresis is the main treatment for Guillain-Barre syndrome.

  • Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Similar to Guillian-Barre, the immune system also attacks the nerves in CIDP, but symptoms last much longer. About 30% of patients can become confined to a wheelchair if not diagnosed and treated early. Treatment for CIDP and GBS are essentially the same.

  • Psoriasis. In psoriasis, overactive immune system blood cells called T-cells collect in the skin. The immune system activity stimulates skin cells to reproduce rapidly, producing silvery, scaly plaques on the skin.

  • Graves' disease. The immune system produces antibodies that stimulate the thyroid gland to release excess amounts of thyroid hormone into the blood (hyperthyroidism). Symptoms of Graves' disease can include bulging eyes as well as weight loss, nervousness, irritability, rapid heart rate, weakness, and brittle hair. Destruction or removal of the thyroid gland, using medicines or surgery, is usually required to treat Graves' disease.

  • Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Antibodies produced by the immune system attack the thyroid gland, slowly destroying the cells that produce thyroid hormone. Low levels of thyroid hormone develop (hypothyroidism), usually over months to years. Symptoms include fatigue, constipation, weight gain, depression, dry skin, and sensitivity to cold. Taking a daily oral synthetic thyroid hormone pill restores normal body functions.

  • Myasthenia gravis. Antibodies bind to nerves and make them unable to stimulate muscles properly. Weakness that gets worse with activity is the main symptom of myasthenia gravis. Mestinon (pyridostigmine) is the main medicine used to treat myasthenia gravis.

  • Vasculitis. The immune system attacks and damages blood vessels in this group of autoimmune diseases. Vasculitis can affect any organ, so symptoms vary widely and can occur almost anywhere in the body. Treatment includes reducing immune system activity, usually with prednisone or another corticosteroid.

Chronic Pain

Pain will usually become less severe as the injury heals. However, chronic pain is different from typical pain. With chronic pain, your body continues to send pain signals to your brain, even after an injury heals. This can last several weeks to years. Chronic pain can limit your mobility and reduce your flexibility, strength, and endurance. This may make it challenging to get through daily tasks and activities.

Chronic pain is defined as pain that lasts at least 12 weeks. The pain may feel sharp or dull, causing a burning or aching sensation in the affected areas. It may be steady or intermittent, coming and going without any apparent reason. Chronic pain can occur in nearly any part of your body. The pain can feel different in the various affected areas.

Some of the most common types of chronic pain include:

  • headache

  • postsurgical pain

  • post-trauma pain

  • lower back pain

  • cancer pain

  • arthritis pain

  • neurogenic pain (pain caused by nerve damage)

  • psychogenic pain (pain that isn’t caused by disease, injury, or nerve damage)

According to the American Academy of Pain Medicine, more than 1.5 billion people around the world have chronic pain. It’s the most common cause of long-term disability in the United States, affecting about 100 million Americans.

Chronic pain is usually caused by an initial injury, such as a back sprain or pulled muscle. It’s believed that chronic pain develops after nerves become damaged. The nerve damage makes pain more intense and long lasting. In these cases, treating the underlying injury may not resolve the chronic pain.

In some cases, however, people experience chronic pain without any prior injury. The exact causes of chronic pain without injury aren’t well understood. The pain may sometimes result from an underlying health condition, such as:

  • chronic fatigue syndrome: characterized by extreme, prolonged weariness that’s often accompanied by pain

  • endometriosis: a painful disorder that occurs when the uterine lining grows outside of the uterus

  • fibromyalgia: widespread pain in the bones and muscles

  • inflammatory bowel disease: a group of conditions that causes painful, chronic inflammation in the digestive tract

  • interstitial cystitis: a chronic disorder marked by bladder pressure and pain

  • temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ): a condition that causes painful clicking, popping, or locking of the jaw

  • vulvodynia: chronic vulva pain that occurs with no obvious cause

Reproductive Health & Chronic Pain

Our womb space carries immense power and yet for many of us women it’s a very wounded or forgotten place, a place we don’t habitually connect to.

The womb space is the creative center of ourselves and is associated with the sacral chakra. Too often we are disconnected from it, sadly neglecting it, or treating it with contempt of negativity, whether because of menstruation issues, menopause or hysterectomy. Or perhaps we are holding old fears and patterns that have come from our parents, or from early negative sexual experiences.  Physically and energetically our wombs store emotional upsets/traumas affecting our natural cycles and digestive system, not mention the tension in our lower backs. When we shun our womb space we damage our creative flow. Physical ailments can occur, and dis-ease manifest when the energy is not flowing freely.

To help heal this imbalance it is necessary to physically and consciously connect with your Womb and to activate her healing and grounding feminine energy. Physical self-care and pampering is very nurturing to our womb space and helps embody the creative cycle of receiving, transforming, creating and giving. Women hold a lot of our flight or fight stuff in the stomach area, which manifests itself in so many different ways, butterflies in the stomach before an exam or meeting, anxiety, fear or even anger or different forms of inflammation, cramp, pain and or congestion. Reproductive issues may sometimes result from an underlying health issue:

  • IBS plagues many women and is widely recognized as a stress marker triggered by acute anxiety.

  • Digestive disorders

  • PCOS

  • Endometriosis

  • Misalignment of the uterus can contribute to problems such as painful periods, PCOS, Endometriosis, heavy or irregular bleeding.

  • Hysterectomy & Tubal Ligation

  • Grief & Trauma


Neurological Disorders

Neurological disorders are diseases of the brain, spine and the nerves that connect them. There are more than 600 diseases of the nervous system, such as brain tumors, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease and stroke as well as less familiar ones such as frontotemporal dementia. Our approach is meant to assist your healthcare plan and provide relief and quality of life. Some other conditions include:

  • ALS

  • Brain Aneurysm

  • Epilepsy

  • Headache

  • Memory Disorders

  • Multiple Sclerosis

  • Parkinson's Disease

  • Peripheral Neuropathy

  • ADD/ADHD

  • Stroke